Lumbar Spondylosis

 

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INTRODUCTION:

  • Lumbar spondylosis describes bony overgrowths (osteophytes), predominantly those at the anterior, lateral, and, less commonly, posterior aspects of the superior and inferior margins of vertebral centra (bodies). This dynamic process increases with, and is perhaps an inevitable concomitant, of age.
  • Spondylosis deformans is responsible for the misconception that osteoarthritis was common in dinosaurs. Osteoarthritis was rare, but spondylosis actually was common.
  • Lumbar spondylosis usually produces no symptoms. When back or sciatic pains are complaints, lumbar spondylosis usually is an unrelated finding.

Lumbar spondylosis is present in 27-37% of the asymptomatic population.

ETIOLOGY:

Lumbar spondylosis appears to be a nonspecific aging phenomenon.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY:

Spondylosis occurs as a result of new bone formation in areas where the anular ligament is stressed.

CLINICAL:

Lumbar spondylosis usually produces no symptoms. When back or sciatic pains are complaints, lumbar spondylosis usually is an unrelated finding. There usually are no findings unless a complication ensues.

Imaging Studies:

  • Radiographs, CT scans, and MRIs are used only in the event of complications.
  • Density (eg, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan [DEXA]) – Ensure that no osteophytes are in the area used for density assessment for spinal studies. Osteophytes produce the impression of increased bone mass, thus invalidating bone density tests if in the field of interest and masking osteoporosis.

Other Tests:

  • Electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) are used only in the event of complications.

Physioline Management includes

Combination Therapy

  • The goal of treatment in osteoarthritis is to reduce joint pain and inflammation while improving and maintaining joint function.
  • conservative measures such as rest, exercise, weight reduction, physical and occupational therapy, and mechanical support devices.
  • Applying local heat before and cold packs after exercise can help relieve pain and inflammation.
  • Swimming is particularly suited for patients with osteoarthritis because it allows patients to exercise with minimal impact stress to the joints.
  • Spine symptoms can improve with a neck collar, lumbar corset, or a firm mattress, depending on what areas are involved.

Visit Physioline for further Consultation and treatment