Coxa Vara

COXA-VARA

INTRODUCTION:

A deformity in which an inward curvature of the hip takes place where the angle between the upper femur and ball joint is reduced and the femoral neck shaft angle is less than 120-135°. This causes pain, stiffness, and results in one leg being shorter than the other, resulting in a limp that can make walking a very difficult task.

CLINICAL FEATURES:

  • small stature,
  • limp,
  • waddling gait,
  • upward shift of greater trochanter,
  • decreased rotation and abduction of hip,
  • pain
  • stiffness
  • flexion contractures.

DISADVANTAGES OF COXA VARA:

  • Normal apposition between joint surfaces is lost
  • Trochanter is displaced upwards and impinges on side of pelvis
  • Marked shortening of limb
  • waddling gait.

TYPES OF COXA VARA:

The way in which Coxa Vara occurs typically falls into one of three categories: It can either be congenital, developmental, or acquired. Congenital Coxa Vara (CCV) is present at birth, and believed to be the result of either embryonic abnormalities or possibly the result of certain intrauterine conditions or mechanical stresses that could affect the way in which the hip forms. The developmental form of Coxa Vara presents itself during early childhood and seems to follow a progressive pattern that continues as the child develops. Acquired forms of the condition can also come as the result of an injury such as a fracture or other traumatic event to the hip

Occurrence of Coxa Vara

Coxa Vara is a rare disease. Estimates for Congenital Coxa Vara suggest the occurrence ranges from 1 in 13,000 to 1 in 25,000 people. Based on an estimated average of 300 million people living in the U.S., this suggests that the estimated number of people in the U.S. who suffer from Congenital Coxa Vara ranges from 12,000 to about 23,000. The disease seems just as likely to affect either gender and seems to occur on either side of the body without prejudice

Treatment for Coxa Vara

The general consensus for treating symptomatic or progressive Congenital Coxa Vara is with surgery. Surgery allows for the reconstructing of the neck shaft angle to make for a more normal and balanced structure. Some recommend that in cases where surgery is needed, that it be done so while the child is still younger rather than older as many believe there is a greater chance for the hip to completely remodel with the newly set structure. Others suggest that waiting until the child is older allows there to be more solid bone to work with. There is no clear universal answer for when surgery should be performed. Each case will be different and every doctor will have his or her own suggestions to follow regarding when surgery should take place, if at all.

Following surgery, a hip cast is put in place until radiographs indicate that healing has begun. This usually takes place after about 2 months, during which time the patient should remain in a non-standing position

PHYSIOLINE’S SPECIALIZED PHYSIOTHERAPY HAS VITAL ROLE TO PLAY

At Physioline, all the members of the rehabilitation team work together so as to provide proper care and the therapy in order to:

  • Pain relief
  • Muscle strengthening
  • Gait training

VISIT PHYSIOLINE FOR FURTHER CONSULTATION AND TREATMENT.